Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Neutrino-Driven 1D Explosions to Light Curves and Spectra

Image
In 2007 NASA’s Spitzer space telescope found the infrared signature of silica (sand) in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. The light from this exploding star first reached Earth in the 1600s. The cyan dot just off center is all that remains of the star that exploded. NASA/JPL-Caltech/ O. Krause (Steward Observatory)
September 14, 2021
11:30AM - 12:30PM
Location
Virtual Zoom Webinar

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2021-09-14 11:30:00 2021-09-14 12:30:00 Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Neutrino-Driven 1D Explosions to Light Curves and Spectra   Speaker: Dr Sanjana Curtis (Amsterdam)- zoom link: https://osu.zoom.us/j/96209154804?pwd=d1lWZnRueGVVa2tabUZTak4xSkpaQT09 Password: CCAPP-2021 Abstract: Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular explosions that mark the deaths of massive stars. The light from a core-collapse supernova can provide valuable clues about the progenitor star, stellar evolution, the explosion mechanism, nucleosynthesis, and the formation of neutron stars and black holes. However, interpreting electromagnetic observations correctly is a formidable challenge, one that requires detailed and accurate computational modeling. In this talk, I will present light curves and spectra for a suite of 62supernova models and show how the light curve morphology relates to the stellar radius and hydrogen envelope mass. I will also describe the first-of-its-kind pipeline I developed, starting from a massive progenitor, through a neutrino-driven explosion in spherical symmetry, to electromagnetic observables. This work opens the door to more detailed analyses of the collective properties of core-collapse supernovae. Virtual Zoom Webinar Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

 

Speaker: Dr Sanjana Curtis (Amsterdam)- zoom link: https://osu.zoom.us/j/96209154804?pwd=d1lWZnRueGVVa2tabUZTak4xSkpaQT09

Password: CCAPP-2021

Abstract: Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular explosions that mark the deaths of massive stars. The light from a core-collapse supernova can provide valuable clues about the progenitor star, stellar evolution, the explosion mechanism, nucleosynthesis, and the formation of neutron stars and black holes. However, interpreting electromagnetic observations correctly is a formidable challenge, one that requires detailed and accurate computational modeling. In this talk, I will present light curves and spectra for a suite of 62supernova models and show how the light curve morphology relates to the stellar radius and hydrogen envelope mass. I will also describe the first-of-its-kind pipeline I developed, starting from a massive progenitor, through a neutrino-driven explosion in spherical symmetry, to electromagnetic observables. This work opens the door to more detailed analyses of the collective properties of core-collapse supernovae.

Events Filters: