CCAPP Seminar: Yi Jia

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October 4, 2022
12:00PM - 1:00PM
Location
PRB 4138

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Add to Calendar 2022-10-04 12:00:00 2022-10-04 13:00:00 CCAPP Seminar: Yi Jia Speaker: Yi Jia (MIT) Latest Results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a multi-purpose high-energy particle detector installed on the International Space Station on May 19, 2011 to conduct a unique long-term mission of fundamental physics research in space. To date, AMS has collected more than 200 billion charged cosmic rays with energies up to multi TeV.  The latest AMS data on cosmic ray positrons show that, at high energies, they predominantly originate either from dark matter annihilations or from new astrophysical sources. Precision measurements from AMS on cosmic ray nuclei and isotopes provide invaluable information on the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. The daily time variation of electrons, positrons, protons, and helium fluxes measured by AMS provides unique inputs to the understanding of cosmic rays in the heliosphere. The perspective of a major upgrade of AMS in the coming years will also be presented. The new results on cosmic rays will continue to change our understanding of the cosmos. PRB 4138 Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
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Speaker: Yi Jia (MIT)

Latest Results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a multi-purpose high-energy particle detector installed on the International Space Station on May 19, 2011 to conduct a unique long-term mission of fundamental physics research in space. To date, AMS has collected more than 200 billion charged cosmic rays with energies up to multi TeV.  The latest AMS data on cosmic ray positrons show that, at high energies, they predominantly originate either from dark matter annihilations or from new astrophysical sources. Precision measurements from AMS on cosmic ray nuclei and isotopes provide invaluable information on the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. The daily time variation of electrons, positrons, protons, and helium fluxes measured by AMS provides unique inputs to the understanding of cosmic rays in the heliosphere. The perspective of a major upgrade of AMS in the coming years will also be presented. The new results on cosmic rays will continue to change our understanding of the cosmos.

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