CCAPP Seminar: "Supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds" Katie Auchettl (OSU)

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February 9, 2016
11:30AM - 12:30PM
Location
PRB 4138

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Add to Calendar 2016-02-09 11:30:00 2016-02-09 12:30:00 CCAPP Seminar: "Supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds" Katie Auchettl (OSU) Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the long lived structures that result from the explosive end of a massive star and they play an important role in the dynamics of the interstellar medium. The shock-front produced by the supernova explosion heats and mixes metal-rich stellar ejecta and swept-up ISM to X-ray emitting temperatures, and are sites in which populations of relativistic particles can be efficiently accelerated to the knee of the Cosmic-ray spectrum. As massive stars tend not travel far from their original birth site, SNRs are usually born in the same dense environment in which their progenitor was born. The interaction between the SNR with this dense molecular material has a profound effect on the morphology and emission properties of these objects. In this talk, I will review the importance of studying these SNRs and their properties. In particular, I will highlight investigations into the high energy emission of these remnants using X-ray and gamma-ray satellites which give an insight into the original progenitor, the properties of the surrounding environment and their abilities to accelerate particles. PRB 4138 Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the long lived structures that result from the explosive end of a massive star and they play an important role in the dynamics of the interstellar medium. The shock-front produced by the supernova explosion heats and mixes metal-rich stellar ejecta and swept-up ISM to X-ray emitting temperatures, and are sites in which populations of relativistic particles can be efficiently accelerated to the knee of the Cosmic-ray spectrum. As massive stars tend not travel far from their original birth site, SNRs are usually born in the same dense environment in which their progenitor was born. The interaction between the SNR with this dense molecular material has a profound effect on the morphology and emission properties of these objects. In this talk, I will review the importance of studying these SNRs and their properties. In particular, I will highlight investigations into the high energy emission of these remnants using X-ray and gamma-ray satellites which give an insight into the original progenitor, the properties of the surrounding environment and their abilities to accelerate particles.

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