CCAPP Seminar: "Studying the Galaxies inside Clusters with the Dark Energy Survey" Yuanyuan Zhang (Michigan)

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January 19, 2016
11:30AM - 12:30PM
Location
PRB 4138

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Add to Calendar 2016-01-19 11:30:00 2016-01-19 12:30:00 CCAPP Seminar: "Studying the Galaxies inside Clusters with the Dark Energy Survey" Yuanyuan Zhang (Michigan) Being the largest virialized cosmic structures, galaxy clusters are important subjects of study for cosmology and also astrophysics research. The enormous amount of dark and baryonic matter inside clusters provides rich tracers of the astrophysical evolution of galaxies and hot intracluster plasma. Wide-field sky survey programs have been steadily pushing the precision limit of research into these rare objects in the universe. Ongoing optical surveys like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) are observing tens of thousands of clusters to redshift 1.0 and beyond, and cosmological studies demand a more refined understanding of cluster observable properties. In this talk, I will demonstrate the power and potential of DES to improve our understanding of cluster astrophysics. I will present new results characterizing the evolution history of cluster central galaxies and cluster red sequence galaxies with DES early data, and discuss prospects for future cluster studies. PRB 4138 Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
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Being the largest virialized cosmic structures, galaxy clusters are important subjects of study for cosmology and also astrophysics research. The enormous amount of dark and baryonic matter inside clusters provides rich tracers of the astrophysical evolution of galaxies and hot intracluster plasma. Wide-field sky survey programs have been steadily pushing the precision limit of research into these rare objects in the universe. Ongoing optical surveys like the Dark Energy Survey (DES) are observing tens of thousands of clusters to redshift 1.0 and beyond, and cosmological studies demand a more refined understanding of cluster observable properties. In this talk, I will demonstrate the power and potential of DES to improve our understanding of cluster astrophysics. I will present new results characterizing the evolution history of cluster central galaxies and cluster red sequence galaxies with DES early data, and discuss prospects for future cluster studies.

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