CCAPP Seminar - Omar Contigiani (Leiden) and Kathryn Neugent (Washington)

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December 1, 2020
11:30AM - 12:30PM
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Zoom Virtual Seminar

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Add to Calendar 2020-12-01 11:30:00 2020-12-01 12:30:00 CCAPP Seminar - Omar Contigiani (Leiden) and Kathryn Neugent (Washington) Omar Contigiani (Leiden Observatory and Lorentz Institute for Theoretical Physics) The outskirts of accreting dark matter halos exhibit a sudden drop in density delimiting their virialized region. After describing the physics shaping this feature and how it is measured, I will discuss some of its applications. In particular, I will examine its connection to the cosmic web and how it can be used to constrain dark sector models.   Kathryn Neugent (Lowell Observatory, Washington) The Binary Fraction of Red Supergiants in the Local Group Galaxies The binary fraction of massive main-sequence OB stars is thought to be as high as 70% or greater. However, until recently, only around a dozen binary red supergiants (RSGs) had been identified, despite the fact that these stars are the evolved descendants of a large portion of OB stars. My research focuses on searching for these "missing" binary RSGs. As dictated by stellar evolution, binary RSGs will likely have B-type companions and such systems will have unique photometric signatures due to the shape of their spectral energy distributions. After observing candidate RSG+B star binaries spectroscopically in the Local Group galaxies of M31, M33 and the Magellanic Clouds, we've discovered over 250 new systems. In this talk I'll discuss how these results have allowed us to place constraints on the binary fraction of RSGs as a function of metallicity and the greater impacts this has on our understanding of massive star evolution, supernovae populations, and the creation of gravitational wave events. Zoom Virtual Seminar Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
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Omar Contigiani (Leiden Observatory and Lorentz Institute for Theoretical Physics)

The outskirts of accreting dark matter halos exhibit a sudden drop in density delimiting their virialized region. After describing the physics shaping this feature and how it is measured, I will discuss some of its applications. In particular, I will examine its connection to the cosmic web and how it can be used to constrain dark sector models.

 

Kathryn Neugent (Lowell Observatory, Washington)

The Binary Fraction of Red Supergiants in the Local Group Galaxies

The binary fraction of massive main-sequence OB stars is thought to be as high as 70% or greater. However, until recently, only around a dozen binary red supergiants (RSGs) had been identified, despite the fact that these stars are the evolved descendants of a large portion of OB stars. My research focuses on searching for these "missing" binary RSGs. As dictated by stellar evolution, binary RSGs will likely have B-type companions and such systems will have unique photometric signatures due to the shape of their spectral energy distributions. After observing candidate RSG+B star binaries spectroscopically in the Local Group galaxies of M31, M33 and the Magellanic Clouds, we've discovered over 250 new systems. In this talk I'll discuss how these results have allowed us to place constraints on the binary fraction of RSGs as a function of metallicity and the greater impacts this has on our understanding of massive star evolution, supernovae populations, and the creation of gravitational wave events.

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