CCAPP Seminar: "Dwarf galaxies as laboratories for astrophysics and cosmology" Kareem El-Badry (Berkeley) 2018 Price Prize Winner

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October 9, 2018
11:30AM - 12:30PM
Location
PRB 4138

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Add to Calendar 2018-10-09 11:30:00 2018-10-09 12:30:00 CCAPP Seminar: "Dwarf galaxies as laboratories for astrophysics and cosmology" Kareem El-Badry (Berkeley) 2018 Price Prize Winner High dark matter fractions make dwarf galaxies ideal laboratories for probing the small-scale structure of dark matter and testing the CDM framework. Shallow gravitational potentials and high gas fractions make dwarf galaxies especially sensitive to the effects of stellar feedback, which can launch large-scale gas outflows from the galaxy into the circumgalactic medium. Sensitivity to feedback is both a blessing and a curse: it means that simulations and observations of dwarf galaxies are ideal for refining feedback models, but it also means that feedback must be understood before observations of dwarf galaxies can robustly distinguish between dark matter theories. I will discuss ongoing efforts to simulate dwarf galaxies, focusing in particular on work from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. I will pay particular attention to tensions between current simulations and observations, speculating on what is still needed to bring simulations and observations into better agreement. PRB 4138 Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
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High dark matter fractions make dwarf galaxies ideal laboratories for probing the small-scale structure of dark matter and testing the CDM framework. Shallow gravitational potentials and high gas fractions make dwarf galaxies especially sensitive to the effects of stellar feedback, which can launch large-scale gas outflows from the galaxy into the circumgalactic medium. Sensitivity to feedback is both a blessing and a curse: it means that simulations and observations of dwarf galaxies are ideal for refining feedback models, but it also means that feedback must be understood before observations of dwarf galaxies can robustly distinguish between dark matter theories. I will discuss ongoing efforts to simulate dwarf galaxies, focusing in particular on work from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. I will pay particular attention to tensions between current simulations and observations, speculating on what is still needed to bring simulations and observations into better agreement.

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