CCAPP Seminar: "Fermi's role in the era of multi-messenger astronomy" Valerie Connaughton (USRA)

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Valerie Connaughton
April 26, 2016
11:00AM - 12:00PM
Location
McPherson 2015

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Add to Calendar 2016-04-26 11:00:00 2016-04-26 12:00:00 CCAPP Seminar: "Fermi's role in the era of multi-messenger astronomy" Valerie Connaughton (USRA) With the uncovering of a mysterious backdrop of astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and the detection of gravitational wave (GW) radiation by LIGO, the era of multi-messenger astronomy is rich in discovery space. I will discuss the role of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in this vibrant field, concentrating on the contributions of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to the detection of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves. The recent discovery of a weak signal in the GBM data, close in time to a GW produced during the merger of two stellar-mass black holes, and consistent in arrival direction with the GW event, was both exciting and unexpected. Future joint observations by LIGO/Virgo and high-energy astrophysical satellites will be needed to establish a firm connection between electromagnetic radiation and black-hole mergers. Over the next few years, LIGO/Virgo will become sensitive enough to detect signals from the mergers of binary systems involving a neutron star. The role of these mergers as the progenitors of short Gamma-Ray Bursts will be confirmed or refuted. McPherson 2015 Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
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With the uncovering of a mysterious backdrop of astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and the detection of gravitational wave (GW) radiation by LIGO, the era of multi-messenger astronomy is rich in discovery space. I will discuss the role of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in this vibrant field, concentrating on the contributions of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to the detection of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves. The recent discovery of a weak signal in the GBM data, close in time to a GW produced during the merger of two stellar-mass black holes, and consistent in arrival direction with the GW event, was both exciting and unexpected. Future joint observations by LIGO/Virgo and high-energy astrophysical satellites will be needed to establish a firm connection between electromagnetic radiation and black-hole mergers. Over the next few years, LIGO/Virgo will become sensitive enough to detect signals from the mergers of binary systems involving a neutron star. The role of these mergers as the progenitors of short Gamma-Ray Bursts will be confirmed or refuted.

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