CCAPP Seminar: "The connected universe: Relating Early, Intermediate and Late Universe with cosmological data"

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April 23, 2019
12:00PM - 1:00PM
Location
PRB 4138

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Add to Calendar 2019-04-23 12:00:00 2019-04-23 13:00:00 CCAPP Seminar: "The connected universe: Relating Early, Intermediate and Late Universe with cosmological data" Vivian Miranda (University of Arizona) The standard paradigm of cosmology is built upon on a series of propositions on how the early, intermediate and late-time universe behaves. It predicts that the universe is currently filled with Dark Energy and Dark Matter. Understanding the properties of dark energy is plausibly the biggest challenge in theoretical physics; while we believe the general features of Dark Matter are well known. Indeed, there is a broad assumption in cosmology that the universe on its earlier stages is fully understood and that discrepancies between the standard model and current/future data are suggestive of distinct Dark Energy properties. Uncertainties on the validity of this hypothesis are rarely taken into account when forecasting surveys capabilities, even though our investigations might be severely obfuscated if the intermediate and early universe do behave abnormally. In this Colloquium, I propose a program to investigate Dark Energy and earlier aspects of our universe simultaneously with space missions in the 2020s in combination with ground-based observatories. This program will help in guiding the strategy for the future WFIRST supernova and weak lensing surveys. Besides, my investigations on how early and intermediate universe affect inferences on dark energy (and vice-versa) will support NASA on how future space missions can be used to test some of the core hypotheses of the standard model.  PRB 4138 Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
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Vivian Miranda (University of Arizona)

The standard paradigm of cosmology is built upon on a series of propositions on how the early, intermediate and late-time universe behaves. It predicts that the universe is currently filled with Dark Energy and Dark Matter. Understanding the properties of dark energy is plausibly the biggest challenge in theoretical physics; while we believe the general features of Dark Matter are well known. Indeed, there is a broad assumption in cosmology that the universe on its earlier stages is fully understood and that discrepancies between the standard model and current/future data are suggestive of distinct Dark Energy properties. Uncertainties on the validity of this hypothesis are rarely taken into account when forecasting surveys capabilities, even though our investigations might be severely obfuscated if the intermediate and early universe do behave abnormally. In this Colloquium, I propose a program to investigate Dark Energy and earlier aspects of our universe simultaneously with space missions in the 2020s in combination with ground-based observatories. This program will help in guiding the strategy for the future WFIRST supernova and weak lensing surveys. Besides, my investigations on how early and intermediate universe affect inferences on dark energy (and vice-versa) will support NASA on how future space missions can be used to test some of the core hypotheses of the standard model. 

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