CCAPP Price Prize Talk - Kaeli Hughes (Chicago)

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Kaeli Hughes
September 21, 2021
11:30AM - 12:30PM
Location
Hybrid Event - In person PRB 4138 and Zoom Virtual Lecture

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2021-09-21 11:30:00 2021-09-21 12:30:00 CCAPP Price Prize Talk - Kaeli Hughes (Chicago) Speaker: Kaeli Hughes Turning on the radio: the search for Astrophysical Neutrinos with the Askaryan Radio Array   Neutrinos offer a unique window into the ultra-high energy universe. Unlike cosmic rays, whose paths bend in the presence of magnetic fields, neutrinos are capable of traveling virtually unimpeded through the universe and point back to their sources. This makes detecting neutrinos a crucial next step in understanding the production mechanisms within the highest energy objects in the universe. In this talk, I will discuss the successes so far in detecting neutrinos above 10 PeV, with a specific focus on the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA), designed to detect the radio emission induced by ultra-high energy neutrinos that interact within the ice at the South Pole. The newest ARA station has been equipped with a phased array trigger, in which radio signals in multiple antennas are summed in predetermined directions prior to the trigger. In this way, impulsive signals add coherently, while noise likely does not, allowing the trigger threshold to be lower than a traditional ARA station. Early results on just a fraction of available data from this new system prove the feasibility of a low-threshold analysis. Hybrid Event - In person PRB 4138 and Zoom Virtual Lecture Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) ccapp@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Speaker: Kaeli Hughes

Turning on the radio: the search for Astrophysical Neutrinos with the Askaryan Radio Array  

Neutrinos offer a unique window into the ultra-high energy universe. Unlike cosmic rays, whose paths bend in the presence of magnetic fields, neutrinos are capable of traveling virtually unimpeded through the universe and point back to their sources. This makes detecting neutrinos a crucial next step in understanding the production mechanisms within the highest energy objects in the universe. In this talk, I will discuss the successes so far in detecting neutrinos above 10 PeV, with a specific focus on the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA), designed to detect the radio emission induced by ultra-high energy neutrinos that interact within the ice at the South Pole. The newest ARA station has been equipped with a phased array trigger, in which radio signals in multiple antennas are summed in predetermined directions prior to the trigger. In this way, impulsive signals add coherently, while noise likely does not, allowing the trigger threshold to be lower than a traditional ARA station. Early results on just a fraction of available data from this new system prove the feasibility of a low-threshold analysis.

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